All posts tagged “Fixed”

UI design pattern tips: ‘sticky’ fixed navigation

Read more about UI design pattern tips: ‘sticky’ fixed navigation at CreativeBloq.com


Once someone starts using your website or web application, they need to know where to go and how to get there at any point. If they can’t navigate through your your application easily, you’ll quickly lose them. Thus, designing effective navigation in your web application is crucial. In this series for Creative Bloq, Chris Bank of UXPin, the UX design app, discusses the importance of navigation design patterns and details examples from some of the hottest websites and web apps today.




Creative Bloq

How to Code a Fixed Auto-Hiding Nav Bar with JavaScript

Let’s start this week from something really interesting. Today we’d like to offer you a tutorial that will teach you how to create an auto-hiding navigation bar powered with JS.
MonsterPost

30 Fantastic Examples of Fixed Navigation Menus in Web Design

Looking at the navigation bar can give you a snapshot idea of what a site is offering, as well as what it’s expecting in return. It’s an abbreviated definition, a road to multiple destinations, and the outstretched hand of invitation to any and all visitors who have happened upon the site in question.

And some manage this complicated little two-step in masterful fashion. This is an article dedicated to those surefooted dancers of web design and development who’ve managed to put a new spin on an ultra-trending trope: The Fixed Navigation.

Fixed navigation bars can scroll down a page with you, reappear panel by panel, collapse and expand at the click of a mouse, interact with users as they browse, or skulk discreetly in the corners of the screen. The versatility of these sticky little boogers (ew) is the imperative of their attraction. Furthermore, it’s the trademark of the site which they inhabit.

Without further ado, we present a series of scintillating sites featuring finely tuned fixed navigation menus.

Fixed Navigation in Web Design

The Music Bed (Fixed Side Navigation)

The Music Bed Fixed Side Navigation

Names for Change (Sliding Fixed Top Navigation)

Names for Change Sliding Fixed Navigation top

Weecom (Animated Navigation)

Weecom Animated fixed Navigation

Visage (Fixed Top Navigation)

Visage Fixed Top Navigation

Prollective (Three-Line Fixed Top Navigation)

Prollective Three-Line Fixed Top Navigation

Tawny Jordan Ring (Fixed Bottom Navigation)

Tawny Jordan Ring Fixed Bottom Navigation

1Bite2Go (Three-Line Fixed Side Navigation)

1Bite2Go Three-Line Fixed Side Navigation

Andy Jones (Animated Fixed Top Navigation)

Andy Jones Animated Fixed Top Navigation

Nishiyama (Fixed Top Navigation)

Nishiyama Fixed Top Navigation

CTP (Three-Line Fixed Top Navigation)

CTP Three-Line  Fixed Top Navigation

Grovemade (Fixed Top Navigation)

Grovemade Fixed Top Navigation

Papertelevision (Three-Line Fixed Top Navigation)

Papertelevision Three-Line Fixed Top Navigation

OASIS (Fixed Top Navigation)

OASIS Fixed Top Navigation

The Offshore Partners (Fixed Top Navigation Button)

The Offshore Partners Fixed Top Navigation Button

A Curated Anthology of Donuts (Fixed Top Navigation)

A Curated Anthology of Donuts Fixed Top Navigation

AWARD (Sliding Fixed Top Navigation)

AWARD Sliding Fixed Top Navigation

Museekly (Fixed Side & Bottom Navigation)

Museekly Fixed Side & Bottom Navigation

Charlie Clark (Fixed Top Navigation)

Charlie Clark Fixed Top Navigation

Script & Seal (Fixed Top Transparent Navigation)

Script & Seal Fixed Top Transparent Navigation

Gareth Emery (Fixed Side & Bottom Navigation)

Gareth Emery Fixed Side & Bottom Navigation

The Conference by Media Evolution 2014 (Three-Line Fixed Side Navigation)

The Conference by Media Evolution 2014 Three-Line Fixed Side Navigation

Wifeel (Animated Fixed Top Navigation)

Wifeel Animated Fixed Top Navigation

Brit + Co. (Fixed Top & Side Navigation)

Brit + Co. Fixed Top & Side Navigation

Kurka Wolna (Fixed Top Navigation)

Kurka Wolna Fixed Top Navigation

Poolhouse (Fixed Top Navigation)

Poolhouse Fixed Top Navigation

Knoed Creative (Three-Line Fixed Top Navigation Button)

Knoed Creative Three-Line Fixed Top Navigation Button

Jonathan da Costa (Three-Line Fixed Side Navigation)

Jonathan da Costa Three-Line Fixed Side Navigation

teamgeek (Fixed Side Navigation)

teamgeek Fixed Side Navigation

Playground Inc. (Fixed Side Navigation)

Playground Inc. Fixed Side Navigation

Squid Compression (Fixed Top Navigation Button)

Squid Compression Fixed Top Navigation Button

Awd Agency (Fixed Side Navigation)

Awd Agency Fixed Side Navigation

The post 30 Fantastic Examples of Fixed Navigation Menus in Web Design appeared first on Speckyboy Design Magazine.


Speckyboy Design Magazine

Rap Genius claims to have fixed its Google search violations

Rap Genius’s three cofounders have a new reason to pop bottles this weekend: they’ve reportedly resolved their issues with Google, according to a lengthy new blog post detailing how they messed up and how they fixed the problem. Last month, Google penalized Rap Genius for using spammy SEO techniques, pushing links to the popular lyrics website further down in Google search results and causing traffic to Rap Genius to plummet.  Rap Genius quickly apologized and promised to amend its ways (“we overstepped, and we deserved to get smacked,” the cofounders say again in today’s blog post), and the mea culpa appears to have worked. “It takes a few days for things to return to normal, but we’re officially back!” the Rap Genius cofounders…

Continue reading…

The Verge – All Posts

Web Designs with Fixed Header. No Glue Was Used

Everyone has already seen it! Now it’s your turn to check out designs with fixed header – one of the major 2013 trends.
Template Monster Blog

Code a Single-Page Sliding Website Layout With Fixed Navigation

preview single page sliding navigation tutorial howto

When constructing a simple webpage, it can often make sense to fit the content into a single layout rather than multiple pages. These single-page websites are beneficial when you have a small project or portfolio which needs some online presence. If you split up content into neat sections, then visitors might use a small sliding navigation to quickly advance along the page.

In this tutorial I want to demonstrate how you can build a custom sliding navigation with jQuery. There are many alternative plugins which provide these features and will also save time. But I want to show how we can make this effect using only jQuery and the scrollTo plugin for optimized performance. Check out my live sample demo to catch a glimpse of what we will be making.

Live DemoDownload Source Code

Getting Started

First I’ve downloaded a local copy of jQuery to keep with the other script files. Also we need a copy of the jQuery.scrollTo plugin which is a single .js file. I have created two alternate files index.html and styles.css for the page structure. We can break down the main contents first.

<!doctype html>
<html lang="en-US">
<head>
  <meta charset="utf-8">
  <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html">
  <title>Single Page Sliding Layout - Design Shack Demo</title>
  <meta name="author" content="Jake Rocheleau">
  <link rel="shortcut icon" href="http://designshack.net/favicon.ico">
  <link rel="icon" href="http://designshack.net/favicon.ico">
  <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="all" href="css/styles.css">
  <script type="text/javascript" src="js/jquery-1.10.2.min.js"></script>
  <script type="text/javascript" src="js/jquery.scrollTo.js"></script>
</head>

The heading contents should be straightforward with nothing overly complicated. The index file uses an HTML5 doctype along with the stylesheet and the two JS files we downloaded. Obviously there are alternatives for customizing the scroll effect, but in this situation it is much easier to implement a plugin. Inside the page HTML we can see how the navigation is setup.

  <div id="w">
    <div id="content">
      <nav id="stickynav">
        <ul id="nav" class="clearfix">
          <li><a href="#topbar">Homepage</a></li>
          <li><a href="#about">About</a></li>
          <li><a href="#photos">Photos</a></li>
          <li><a href="#contact">Contact</a></li>
        </ul>
      </nav>

All of the page is contained inside a wrapper using the ID #w. Another div #content marks the inner content on the page. This fixed navigation is kept within the page content for my demo, but you could theoretically move this anywhere else that fits nicely. Since it will be fixed you can always have the menu scrolling right along with the user no matter what placement.

The container #stickynav is used to keep all of the internal elements on top of the page content. I am using the CSS z-index property along with internal floats on all the list items. Notice the HREF values all point towards a hash sign located somewhere else on the page. We can use this value to determine where our slider should go.

Internal Content

After closing the navigation block we find a small number of content sections. There is a lot of extra spacing between content, just so you can see how it would behave in a typical webpage. Each block container is using the HTML5 <section> element along with a class name .section.

    <section id="about" class="section">
      <h2>About Us</h2>
      ....
    </section>

The class is used for duplicate styles found in each of the content areas. It will save room in the stylesheet when copying over multiple properties for each element. By targeting the section ID we could apply unique backgrounds, text colors, box shadows, and other similar effects.

This method can include as many internal content sections as you need. Although the navigation menu can eventually grow too wide. In this case it could also be placed at the very top as a fixed navbar. I kept it within the content div so we can see how the solution works built around a page template. Let’s jump into the CSS styles for more detail.

CSS Page Design

I really wanted to distinguish between the top bar and this fixed sticky navigation. We could have fixed the very top brown navbar which also holds a link, but this can eat up a small portion of the layout. Instead I’ve created a new unordered list and styled each link to float along next to each other – keeping the menu tighter and more compact.

#topbar {
  background: #4f4a41;
  padding: 10px 0 10px 0;
  text-align: center;
  height: 36px;
  overflow: hidden;
  -webkit-transition: height 0.5s linear;
  -moz-transition: height 0.5s linear;
  transition: height 0.5s linear;
}
#topbar a {
  color: #fff;
  font-size:1.3em;
  line-height: 1.25em;
  text-decoration: none;
  opacity: 0.5;
  font-weight: bold;
}
#topbar a:hover {
  opacity: 1;
}

#stickynav {
  display: block;
  height: 35px;
  width: 100%;
  z-index: 9999;
}

#stickynav #nav { position: fixed; z-index: 9999; }
#stickynav #nav li { display: inline; }
#stickynav #nav li a {
  display: block;
  float: left;
  margin-right: 8px;
  font-size: 1.2em;
  font-weight: bold;
  padding: 5px 7px;
  background: #cce4c4;
  -webkit-border-radius: 4px;
  -moz-border-radius: 4px;
  border-radius: 4px;
}
#stickynav #nav li a:hover { 
  text-decoration: none;
  background: #d8f0d0;
}

Looking at the container #stickynav you’ll notice this will span the entirety of the page width. Using a transparent background it certainly isn’t noticeable, but keep this in mind since you can expand the navigation even wider to fill the outer page wrapper.

Another interesting part of my stylesheet has the form inputs and page containers. These rules are all located at the bottom of the file along with typography updates. Notice how each header is centered on the page to offer space to the side for these navigation items. It wouldn’t be difficult to realign these headers to the right side giving even more space for navigation links.

form .basic {
  display: block;
  font-size: 1.5em;
  color: #555;
  font-family: Arial, Tahoma, sans-serif;
  padding: 4px 6px;
  margin-bottom: 10px;
}

form .basictxt {
  display: block;
  width: 550px;
  height: 180px;
  font-family: Arial, Tahoma, sans-serif;
  color: #666;
  padding: 5px 8px;
  font-size: 1.6em;
  line-height: 1.4em;
}

/** page structure **/
#w {
  display: block;
  width: 750px;
  margin: 0 auto;
  padding-top: 30px;
}

#content {
  display: block;
  width: 100%;
  background: #fff;
  padding: 25px 20px;
  padding-bottom: 35px;
  -webkit-box-shadow: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.1) 0px 1px 2px 0px;
  -moz-box-shadow: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.1) 0px 1px 2px 0px;
  box-shadow: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.1) 0px 1px 2px 0px;
}

I don’t have the contact form submitting anywhere but I did want it to have some decent custom styles. Certainly nothing special but it does reset the default fonts and colors. Also if you need to expand the central content area you can find the width: 750px property attached onto the outer wrapper. Nothing out of the ordinary but it is good to understand these basic styles.

Smooth Scrolling with jQuery

Now this final block of code is pretty simple even if you hardly understand scripting. I have added a new tag before my closing </body> which targets the fixed nav anchor links. Whenever a user clicks we pull out the hash value and immediately scroll to that page section.

$  (function(){
  $  ("#nav a").click(function(e){
    e.preventDefault();
    $  ('html,body').scrollTo(this.hash,this.hash); 
  });
});

The jQuery .click() method includes a parameter for the event handler. With this parameter we cancel the default behavior so the browser will not jump down the page. Then jQuery scrollTo is run targeting the current link value this.hash.

The effect is simple yet handy because you can implement the page concept very quickly. I am sure there are other similar plugins related to jQuery scrollTo, and if you have the time it can be fun toying around with alternatives.

Live DemoDownload Source Code

Final Thoughts

Simpler websites don’t require a convoluted menu system and utilizing techniques like this can help when organizing content. I do hope this tutorial can provide some use for developers creating a simple webpage layout. jQuery is very extensible and it’s easy to expand this codebase into your own jQuery plugin. Feel free to download a copy of my source code and see if you can incorporate this effect with any future projects.

Design Shack

Simple Steps for Creating a Fixed Navigation Bar

featured-image-scrolling-navbar-navigation

When designing a navigation system for your website it is important to consider dynamic alterations for handling mobile support and responsive designs. But another systematic approach is to keep your visitors in full control throughout the entire viewing process. This often requires a quick-to-access menu or dropdown area for pulling links to other webpages.

In this tutorial I’m going to be building a top navigation bar which appears only after moving beyond the header navigation. This effect is great if you have a few pages which are most commonly accessed by visitors. The sticky navbar will stay fixed at the top of the screen and only disappear when re-entering the header nav zone. To get an idea of what we will be making check out my live demo example after the jump!

Live DemoDownload Source Code

Structuring the Document

First we should create the project workspace and build the original HTML code. It’s worth noting we will need to use some very basic jQuery along with the CSS effects.

Create a new set of documents named index.html and styles.css within the same directory. I am using a custom background image and logo banner in the header section. You may download these resources along with my source code if you want to save time. Now in the main index file we need to setup an HTML5 doctype plus add the related links.

<!doctype html>
<html lang="en-US">
<head>
  <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;charset=utf-8">
  <title>Fixed Top Navigation Toolbar</title>
  <meta name="author" content="Jake Rocheleau">
  <link rel="shortcut icon" href="http://designshack.net/favicon.ico">
  <link rel="icon" href="http://designshack.net/favicon.ico">
  <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="all" href="styles.css">
  <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="all" href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Capriola">
  <script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.9.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
</head>

Thankfully a lot of the resources we need can be hosted externally. Our custom Google web font named Capriola styles the header text and we also need a copy of the latest jQuery library hosted from Google’s code CDN. Most of this should be familiar so let’s now jump into the body content.

HTML Building Blocks

The layout isn’t as complicated as you might first think. At the very top after opening the body tag we need to setup the fixed navigation bar. This element will use display: none; to initially stay hidden until after scrolling a bit down the page.

  <nav id="fixedbar">
    <ul id="fixednav">
      <li><a href="#">Homepage</a></li>
      <li><a href="#">About Us</a></li>
      <li><a href="#">Community</a></li>
      <li><a href="#">Staff Members</a></li>
      <li><a href="#">Contact</a></li>
    </ul>
  </nav>

The inner UL element will center all the links so they are in the same location as the main content. Then underneath this navbar we setup the main wrapper div which centers the page at 710px width, minus 30px for padding. The total comes out to 680px which is the perfect size for Pontus Johansson’s freebie used in the banner design.

  <div id="w">
    <header id="logo"><a href="index.html"><span id="logobg">SomeWebsiteLogo</span></a></header>
    
    <nav id="navigation">
      <ul>
        <li><a href="#">Homepage</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">About Us</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Community</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Staff Members</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Contact</a></li>
      </ul>
    </nav>
    
    <div id="content">
    <!-- content here -->
    </div>
  </div>

The main navigation bar has the exact same links as we are keeping in the fixed header bar. This was made so by design, however you could change things up and place only the most important links in your fixed navigation. The header may contain dropdowns which also feel out of place in a sliding fixed navbar.

Customizing CSS

Before handling the brief snippet of JavaScript let me explain how we can style all this code. First I am using a more customized style of resets based off Eric Meyer’s original stylesheet. I have defined the box-sizing property as border-box so that exact width values include margin/padding and not expand, as is the default behavior.

html, body, div, span, applet, object, iframe, h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6, p, blockquote, pre, a, abbr, acronym, address, big, cite, code, del, dfn, em, img, ins, kbd, q, s, samp, small, strike, strong, sub, sup, tt, var, b, u, i, center, dl, dt, dd, ol, ul, li, fieldset, form, label, legend, table, caption, tbody, tfoot, thead, tr, th, td, article, aside, canvas, details, embed, figure, figcaption, footer, header, hgroup, menu, nav, output, ruby, section, summary, time, mark, audio, video {
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  border: 0;
  font-size: 100%;
  font: inherit;
  vertical-align: baseline;
  outline: none;
  -webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%;
  -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
  -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
  box-sizing: border-box;
}
html { height: 101%; }
body { font-family: Tahoma, Verdana, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 62.5%; line-height: 1; padding-bottom: 65px; background: #444 url('images/bg.png'); }

article, aside, details, figcaption, figure, footer, header, hgroup, menu, nav, section { display: block; }
ol, ul { list-style: none; }

blockquote, q { quotes: none; }
blockquote:before, blockquote:after, q:before, q:after { content: ''; content: none; }
strong { font-weight: bold; } 

table { border-collapse: collapse; border-spacing: 0; }
img { border: 0; max-width: 100%; }

The background image is using Debut Dark from the Subtle Patterns website. There are a lot of fantastic repeating textures you can download for free to improve the quality of your layouts. But moving onto the core structure we need to setup a wrapper container so it will fill naturally in the center content. Also the background should appear white in the content area but not in the full header section.

#w {
  display: block;
  width: 710px;
  padding: 14px 15px;
  margin: 0 auto;
  margin-top: 45px;
}

#content {
  display: block;
  background: #fff;
  padding: 14px 20px;
}

#logo { display: block; border: 1px solid #232323; border-bottom-width: 0; }
#logobg { 
  display: block;
  width: 100%;
  height: 130px;
  background: url('images/logo.png') top left no-repeat;
  text-indent: 100%;
  white-space: nowrap;
  overflow: hidden;
}

/* top navigation */
#navigation {
  display: block;
  height: 35px;
  background-color: #131313;
  background-image: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, from(#202020), to(#131313));
  background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #202020, #131313);
  background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #202020, #131313);
  background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #202020, #131313);
  background-image: -o-linear-gradient(top, #202020, #131313);
  background-image: linear-gradient(top, #202020, #131313);
}

#navigation ul { list-style: none; padding: 0px 7px; }

#navigation ul li { display: inline; float: left; }
#navigation ul li a { 
  display: block; 
  padding: 0 8px; 
  color: #fff;
  font-size: 1.1em;
  text-decoration: none;
  line-height: 35px; 
  font-weight: bold; 
  margin-right: 6px;
  text-shadow: 1px 1px 1px #000;
  -webkit-transition: all 0.2s linear;
  -moz-transition: all 0.2s linear;
  transition: all 0.2s linear;
}
#navigation ul li a:hover { color: #a8d6e7; }

I have setup a very colorful repeating background gradient on the main navigation menu. Also using a fixed height for the bar we can setup the same fixed value for line-height properties on the list items. This forces all text to be centered vertically within the navbar container. I’ve included a few CSS3 transition properties for handling a more sleek hover state.

Fixing the Hidden Navbar

At the very bottom of our CSS stylesheet you will find all the codes related to our fixed top navigation. The container spans 100% of the page width so that we see the bar appear across the whole screen. But the internal UL object holds all the links centered at the same position as our content. Also the background color is applied using rgba() syntax for alpha-transparency.

/* hidden fixed navigation */
#fixedbar { 
  display: none;
  position: fixed;
  top: 0;
  width: 100%;
  height: 80px;
  background: rgba(0,0,0,0.75);
}

#fixednav { 
  display: block;
  width: 710px;
  margin: 0 auto;
  padding: 0px 25px;
}

#fixednav li a {
  display: block;
  float: left;
  font-size: 1.75em;
  font-weight: bold;
  color: #96aed8;
  line-height: 80px;
  text-decoration: none;
  padding: 0px 8px;
  margin-right: 6px; 
  -webkit-transition: all 0.2s linear;
  -moz-transition: all 0.2s linear;
  transition: all 0.2s linear; 
}
#fixednav li a:hover {
  color: #fff;
  background: rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
}

Again we can see a fixed height at 80px which is fairly large in comparison to the original. But it does catch your attention and the links are very easy to maneuver. I wanted to keep a similar animation effect using CSS3 transitions on hover. So the links fill in another 30% background which appears darker, but still transparent for the content behind it.

Handling JavaScript Animations

I am looking at the very bottom of our index.html file before the final closing </body> tag. Here I want to add a small bit of JavaScript which will handle the scrolling effects for displaying and hiding the fixed navbar. We can break it down line-by-line for the more complicated stuff.

<script type="text/javascript">
$  (document).ready(function(){
  $  ('#navigation a, #fixedbar a').on('click', function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
  });
  
  $  (window).on('scroll',function() {
    var scrolltop = $  (this).scrollTop();

    if(scrolltop >= 215) {
      $  ('#fixedbar').fadeIn(250);
    }
    
    else if(scrolltop <= 210) {
      $  ('#fixedbar').fadeOut(250);
    }
  });
});
</script>

The typical jQuery call pauses execution for the DOM to finish rendering before running any codes. We can also ignore the first block which uses the line e.preventDefault(); for stopping anchor links from loading. The most important stuff is handled inside the event listener for $ (window).on('scroll') which is firing a new function every time the user scrolls up or down.

The variable “scrolltop” contains the value in pixels from the very top of the screen. This will update every time the user scrolls to a new location. Using this value we can check if the user has scrolled beyond 215px and if so, display the hidden navbar. On the other hand if they scroll up at 210px or less then we know the main header navigation bar is coming into view, so we hide the fixed navbar and clear up the screen space.

fixed-scrolling-navigation-demo-preview

Live DemoDownload Source Code

Final Thoughts

Although this is a relatively simple effect the code may be confusing if you are unfamiliar with JavaScript. Spend a bit of time going over my snippets to ensure that you understand how we are displaying and hiding the menu. Also feel free to download a copy of my project source code and toy around on your own. If you’d like to drop any questions or comments on this tutorial let us know in the post discussion thread.

Design Shack

25 Inspiring Web Designs with Clever Fixed Header Effects

header effectWeb designers are coming with cool and eye-catching effects within their design every day. For your inspiration, here we’re showcasing beautiful and clever use of CSS to create interacting animation effect in website header. Some of these examples are simply fix the header in place at the top of the screen, while others collapse the header as the user scrolls and a few display some super cool animated effects that rearrange the header content. Hope you will find them inspiring. Enjoy!

Inspiring Web Designs with Clever Fixed Header Effects

Rockaway Relief
header effect

By Association Only
header effect

Kiawah Island Real Estate
header effect

Always Creative
header effect

Engage Interactive
header effect

Steve Zeidner
header effect

Jet Cooper
header effect

Snowbird
header effect

Grand
header effect

Kait Bos
header effect

Heathlife
header effect

Colin Grist
header effect

Fhoke
header effect

I Shot Him
header effect

Playground Inc.
header effect

Red Antler
header effect

WebKnit
header effect

Seed Spot
header effect

Grain & Mortar
header effect

Karma
header effect

Ditto
header effect

Manos
header effect

Adhara
header effect

Daniel Filler
header effect

Something Splendid
header effect

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Web Design Fact