All posts tagged “models”

McKean Studio Mini Cities: Catch a little wanderlust with these bite-sized models of Palm Springs and NYC

McKean Studio Mini Cities

Joshua and Megan McKean of the eponymous McKean Studio are serious road warriors with a knack for finding hidden gems in every city they visit. With a blog full of impressive photos and stories documenting their travels, it’s undeniable that the……

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Cool Hunting

Get free ZBrush models, brushes and training

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Issue 191 of 3D World is on sale next week, and it’s packed full of tips, tutorials and insights for 3D artists.




Creative Bloq

How to create realistic metallic models in Blender

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Metal is an extremely tricky subject to reproduce in 3D. To make it look believable we need to pay attention to many different things: details in specular highlights, rusty parts, edge scratches, roughness and glossiness variation. In this training, I’ll show you how to easily create an old and rusty metal. We’ll also cover various properties of the old metal and ways to reproduce it using material layers.




Creative Bloq

Elegant app puts posable models at your fingertips

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Altering the lighting can produce dramatically different results. With iPads fast becoming a dominant medium for portable digital art, it’s no surprise that an entire ecosystem similar to PCs and Macs has sprung up.




Creative Bloq

The North Circular’s First Book: A Good Yarn : The handmade, ethically focused knitting brand, powered by Brit models Katherine Poulton and Lily Cole, offers 30 projects to knit yourself

The North Circular's First Book: A Good Yarn


by Caroline Kinneberg Marking five years since friends and fellow models Lily Cole and Katherine Poulton launched their luxury ethical knitwear brand The North Circular, the duo recently released the…

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Cool Hunting

Why 3D-printed models are the new business cards

Read more about Why 3D-printed models are the new business cards at CreativeBloq.com


Ashley Sparling has used this 3D printed design to attract the attention of prospective new clients As 3D printing technology continues to evolve, designers are harnessing its power to get themselves noticed in new ways.




Creative Bloq

60 free 3D models from Xfrog

Read more about 60 free 3D models from Xfrog at CreativeBloq.com


If you’re in need of some foliage for your 3D scene then why not save yourself some time and download one of these free models from Xfrog. The team has recently updated its libraries of assets, which includes over 60 free downloads of all manner of 3D trees, shrubs and plants.




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Gewone Letters – Gerrit’s Early Models Wins Bronze at European Design Awards 2014

One of the winners at the recent European Design Awards was Gewone Letters – Gerrit’s Early Models which won Bronze in the category Self-Initiated Projects. The lovely limited edition publication by Geen Bitter uses the equally lovely FF Dora, designed by Slávka Pauliková and released through FontFont last year.

Gerrit Noordzij’s contributions to the field of typography cannot be overstated. The typographer and type designer directed the writing and lettering programme at the Royal Academy of Arts in the Hague, the Netherlands, an early precursor to the Type and Media master. His work and theories on the construction of letters influenced generations of type designers (in particular his sons Christoph and Peter Matthias Noordzij, Petr van Blokland, Just van Rossum and Erik van Blokland of LettError, and Frank E Blokland), who in turn became teachers and role models for subsequent generations of type design students. Noordzij is best known for the Noordzij cube, a groundbreaking way of analysing letter forms by way of three axes – type of contrast (z), increasing contrast (x) and diminishing contrast (y) – thus eliminating the need for separate categories.

While cleaning the letterpress workshop a couple of years ago when they were still students at the KABK, the future co-founders of Geen Bitter did an amazing discovery. They found a package that by the looks of it hadn’t been opened in quite some time. Inside that package were eighteen printing plates in mint condition. It turned out those plates had been made by Gerrit Noordzij and dated back to the late 1960s. They contained a concise lesson about writing with the broad nib pen, starting with the basics, then expanding with additional writing and drawing techniques. Since it became apparent that the plates had never been published before, Thom Janssen, Jorn Henkes and Rogier van der Sluis decided to produce a book reprinting the plates. To provide context and background they asked former students to contribute. Albert-Jan Pool, Frank E. Blokland, Aad van Dommelen, Huug Schipper, and Petr van Blokland wrote short essays with commentary about the plates and Noordzij’s teaching. The publication also contains examples of their own student work and sketches annotated by Gerrit Noordzij.

Since the printing plates were made for letterpress, Geen Bitter wanted to make a companion edition with all the plates printed as separate sheets at actual size. The Deluxe Edition consists of a box containing the book and the eighteen plates letterpress printed on heavy stock. Sander Pinkse and Thomas Gravemaker helped produce this special version, printing the plates in a numbered limited edition of 125. On October 10th last year Geen Bitter unveiled Gewone Letters at ATypI Amsterdam 2013 and presented Gerrit Noordzij with the first copy, the same evening he was honoured with the TDC Medal.

Geen Bitter were so kind to send me the Deluxe Edition for review. The publication is very well presented in a slender cardboard box adorned with a tasteful sticker. Opening the box reveals the 72-page perfect-bound book of modest dimensions and the slightly bigger prints of the original plates, stacked and wrapped in a semi-transparent white sheet of paper. The silky-smooth stock of the book feels very pleasant, and the printing in black with supporting blue is of high quality.

Gewone Letters definitely has that “must-have” quality of a unique publication that you want to boast about against your friends once it is sold out. I know, that’s not a nice thing to do, but hey, we’re only human. The content is wonderfully nerdy, from the reproduction of the prints (with English translations) to the eclectic commentary by five important names in (type) design. The essays range from anecdotal to academic. They offer some interesting insights into Noordzij and those early plates in relation to his later work.

The rather compact typesetting in FF Dora is very pleasant to read, yet it is marred by a stray line break and two or three typos. More importantly the essays could have used some copy-editing love, as the contributors master English in varying degrees. I understand though that hiring an editor for a self-initiated publication may have exceeded the budget. But that is only a minor quibble. Although its appeal for the general public is probably limited, Gewone Letters is highly recommended for type enthusiast and type design students and professionals. This introduction to the early work of arguably the greatest living theorist in typography and type design is definitely worth the price of admission. Incidentally it also serves as great specimen for Slávka Pauliková’s superb type family.

You can order Gewone Letters – Gerrit Noordzij’s Early Models in the Geen Bitter webshop.


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10 websites to find free models for 3D printing

cubehero

3D printers are the hottest topic in the marketplace as more consumers warm up to and adopt the idea of 3D printing. It’s going mainstream, and ‘The Micro’ is a kick starter project for a 3D printer project for your consumers. But it doesn’t mean once you have 3D printer you can start right away. Instead you will require several materials and most importantly the blue print to printout your products. Now if you are confused with this 3D modeling then relax! There are several websites that offer you free 3D models to print on their printers free of charge. Here I am introducing you to 10 such websites where you can find free models for 3D printing.

3DVIA

3DVIA is a company that presents you with several 3D modeling and publishing tools. These tools are aimed for both consumers and professionals. The website also presents a Content Warehouse where the community hosts and shares their content.

3dvia

Cubehero

Cubehero is a website that let users to host and organize their 3D printed projects in order to aid further collaboration on their work that includes discussion and contribution both. And if you are not finding what you are searching for then you can simply make a request for it from the community and you’ll be helped anyway. cubehero

GrabCAD

GrabCAD is a website that is aimed to “help engineers develop products faster”. It offers several tools that help them collaborate with their files. grabcad

Instructables

Instructables is a website based on community where users can share their DIY projects that includes things made using a 3D printer. Also there are the how-to’s and instructions on how to build their creations. instructable

My Mini factory

My Mini Factory is a website with 3D model repository managed by iMakr, an online store that sells 3D printers and accessories. It also operates the largest 3D printing store in Central London. my-mini-factory

YouMagine

YouMagine is an also a community based website run by a 3D printer company. This one is run by the open source 3D printer company Ultimaker. Though this website just started on 2013, it is filled with many interesting things to print. youmagine

Pinshape

Pinshape, which is similar in style with Pinterest, is a 3D model marketplace that still in beta. As in Pinterest, it also has the ability to repin favorites. You can either purchase the model from the designer or download the files to print it yourself, if they offer it. pinshape

Repables

Repables is nothing more than just a very simple site that aims to be a repository of 3D printed model files. It is a bare bone website that allows users to upload their files to share, and download files they want to use. repables

3dibility

3dibility is a search engine that will crawl the Web in search of 3D prints, looking through many 3D modeling sites for files compatible with 3D printers. 3dbility

Yeggi

Yeggi is another search engine that will search major 3D printing websites for files that are compatible with 3D printers. yeggi

The post 10 websites to find free models for 3D printing appeared first on Design daily news.

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25 Websites To Download Free STL Models For 3D Printers

3D printers are going mainstream, as more consumers warm up to and adopt the idea of 3D printing. The Micro, for example, is a Kickstarter project for a 3D printer for consumers. It was funded in mere minutes. But you can’t start printing once you get your printer. You will need to get the materials and more importantly the blueprint to printout your product.

If 3D modelling sounds difficult to you, fret not, the Web is filled with sites that offer users free 3D models to print on their printers free of charge. In this post, we’ve compiled 25 websites that you can use to search and download free STL models for 3D printers. Hopefully you will be able to find what you are looking for in these spots.

Thingiverse

Thingiverse is a website operated by MakerBot Industries, the creators of the popular Replicator series of 3D printers. The website allows users to upload and share 3D model files to be used on 3D printers. The site is extremely popular and has a large community of people uploading files of varying categories, so if you’re looking for cool things to print, Thingiverse is the site to visit.

[Visit page]

Thinigverse

YouMagine

Similar to Thingiverse, YouMagine is a community website run by a 3D printer company. This one is run by the open source 3D printer company Ultimaker. It is relatively new (it started out in 2013), yet it is filled with interesting things to print. The community is still growing and with the backing of a major 3D printer manufacturer, this site is one to look out for.

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YouMagine

Cubify

Cubify is the website for the Cube series of consumer 3D printers, which is created by 3D Systems. The site mainly offers you ways to buy 3D printed items and files but it does make available some interesting free items, mainly under their Kids section, some of which children can customize using a web app.

[Visit page]

Cubify

My Mini Factory

My Mini Factory is the 3D model repository managed by iMakr, an online store that sells 3D printers and accessories. It also operates the largest 3D printing store in Central London. The site contains 3D models designed by professionals and all uploaded designs are tested for quality. You can also make a request for 3D models that their designers will create then share.

[Visit page]

My Mini Factory

GrabCAD

The aim of GrabCAD is to “help engineers develop products faster”, offering tools that help them collaborate with their files. But for the average 3D printing enthusiast, the best part of the site is their large library of free files created by a community of over a million engineers. Registration is required but the number of files offered is worth it.

[Visit page]

GrabCAD

DEFCAD

DEFCAD is a website currently in its alpha phase. It acts as a search engine for 3D printable models and a community forum for 3D modelers. The site is created by Defence Distributed, which release the plans for their 3D printed gun, the Liberator (now removed) on it.

[Visit page]

defcad

Autodesk 123D

Autodesk 123D is a suite of computer aided design (CAD) and 3D modeling tools aimed specifically at hobbyists. Along with the suite of tools, Autodesk also has a website where users can upload their creations and share it with other users. Many of the models can be downloaded and printed, using Autodesk as a utility to interface with MakerBot 3D printer.

[Visit page]

Autodesk 123D

3DVIA

3DVIA is a company that offers 3D modeling and publishing tools that are aimed at both the consumer and professionals. Their website offers a Content Warehouse, where the community hosts and shares their contents. Registration is required to download the files.

[Visit page]

3DVIA

Cubehero

Cubehero is a website that allows users to host and organize their 3D printed projects in order to aid further collaboration on their work. Think of it as a GitHub for 3D printing, where users can share their files, discuss projects and contribute to them. There is also a way to make request, so if you can’t find what you are looking for, you can request for it from the community.

[Visit page]

Cubehero

Bld3r

Billing itself as a 3D Printing Social Network, Bld3r is a thriving community of makers who like to feature their creations. Users vote on the best creations, so popular creations rise to the top and get better exposure. The site features items that are hosted on the social network and outside of it too, like on Thingiverse and YouMagine.

[Visit page]

Bld3r

Sproutform

Another 3D printing community, Sproutform is a website dedicated to giving users ways to share their design and help people print 3D creations. Sproutform has a system that tries to learn what you like. The more you interact with the site by downloading and rating designs, the better it is with recommendations.

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Sproutform

Shapeways

Shapeways is mainly an online shop where you can purchase 3D printed items or have your own 3D model printed by them. But if you look close enough, you can find the people who sell their wares also offering the files required for you to print them yourself.

[Visit page]

Shapeways

Instructables

Instructables is a community where users can share their DIY projects and this includes things made using a 3D printer. Also included are the how-to’s and instructions on how to build their creations, and some helpful designers take the time to answer questions fielded by the public.

[Visit page]

Instructables

Cults

A French community and marketplace where modelers can share or sell their designs, Cults has a collection of high quality models you can download. Users can follow their favorite designers and modelers and get instant updates when a new creation is posted. The name of the site, Cults, is St. Luc, the patron saint of painters, spelt backwards. The website also supports English.

[Visit page]

cults

Pinshape

Pinshape, a 3D model marketplace still in beta, is similar in style to Pinterest, in terms of layout, look and the ability to repin favorites. You can either purchase the model from the designer or download the files to print it yourself, if they offer it.

[Visit page]

Pinshape

RascomRas

RascomRas is a Spanish website that allows users to upload and share 3D model files. RascomRas at one point ran an Indiegogo campaign to fund their very own 3D printer. The campaign unfortunately didn’t get funded.

[Visit page]

RascomRas

Repables

Repables is a very simple site that aims to be a repository of 3D printed model files, nothing more. It is a barebone website that allows users to upload their files to share, and download files they want to use. The site contains a lot of small, simple 3D models to print, with a nice selection of everyday items and even replacement parts for printers.

[Visit page]

Repables

ShapeDo

Another site that is taking inspiration from GitHub, ShapeDo offers a place for 3D model designers to share and collaborate on their creations. It offers users plenty of things to print, and instructions to get the best print possible.

[Visit page]

ShapeDo

3D Hacker

Another online community for 3D printing hobbyists, showcasing interesting items from 3D printers, electronics and most importantly, 3D models is 3D Hacker. There are a lot of very cool model vehicles and buildings to print, along with add-ons and parts for your 3D printer.

[Visit page]

3D Hacker

Fabster

Born out of a Facebook group, Fabster is mainly a platform to show what can be done with 3D printing. Quoting its founder Peter Sayers, Fabster aims to be “a kind of Facebook of 3D printing, with a mix of Thingiverse too.” The site has a great selection of 3D-printed jewelry and accessories.

[Visit page]

Fabster

Fabribles

Fabribles is a fairly new community, so there aren’t a lot of users just yet. However, there is a good selection of replacement parts for RepRap 3DR Delta printers.

[Visit page]

Fabribles

CGTrader

While primarily a place to buy and sell 3D models of all kinds, not just those for 3D printing, CGTrader does offer a selection of free models that can be used on a 3D printer.

[Visit page]

CGTrader

Google Custom Search

When in doubt, use Google Custom Search to find the files to 3D print what you wish. This is useful when you want to search through all the sites at once for that one same thing.

[Visit page]

Google Custom Search

Yeggi

Yeggi is a search engine that will search major 3D printing websites for files that are compatible with 3D printers. You can also look up some of the popular searches to get an idea what the community is currently interested in.

[Visit page]

Yeggi

3dbility

Here’s another search engine that will crawl the Web in search of 3D prints, looking through many 3D modeling sites for files compatible with 3D printers.

[Visit page]

3dbility





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