All posts tagged “Reading”

Neil Gaiman’s reading of ‘The Graveyard Book’ makes me squeal like a schoolgirl

“Neil Gaiman, best known for being a low-rent version of Terry Pratchett in a leather jacket,” quips one of my colleagues — name withheld to protect the heathen — amid a discussion of my beloved author’s reading of The Graveyard Book. I won’t lie. I immediately went on the defensive. Gaiman occupies a shelf in my heart beside The Mirror Empire’s fiercely outspoken Kameron Hurley and short story virtuoso Benjanun Sriduangkaew.

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A History of Reading: Six thousand years of the written word as explored by a great essayist

A History of Reading


In 1996, essayist and editor Alberto Manguel produced a 22-chapter literary adventure solely exploring the act of reading. His passion for turning the pages was met with clever anecdotes and well-researched information, all uniting to form…

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Cool Hunting

‘Reading Rainbow’ will come to Android after closing Kickstarter at over $5.4 million

LeVar Burton’s Kickstarter campaign to bring Reading Rainbow to more platforms and to thousands of classrooms for free closed today with funding of over $ 5.4 million — not including the additional $ 1 million that Family Guy creator Seth MacFarlane plans to donate. Having hit its ambitious $ 5 million stretch goal, Burton’s company will now be bringing Reading Rainbow to Android as well as the Xbox, PlayStation, Apple TV, and Roku. Originally, Burton had only announced plans to bring Reading Rainbow to the web. Reading Rainbow‘s campaign estimates that the web portion should be ready by next May.

Some of the additional funding is also going toward giving schools free access to Reading Rainbow‘s website and apps. Burton plans to provide…

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You should be reading tween hacker magazines from the 1980s

It was the mid-1980s, and Matthew Broderick had barely averted nuclear war in WarGames. Congress was passing the first computer fraud laws, which would be used in 1989 to indict the man who semi-inadvertently released the first internet worm. And children across the country were figuring out how to be hackers. Meryl Alper of USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism has taken a fascinating look at the computer magazines aimed at teens and preteens in the 1980s, after the idea of computer hacking was on the radar but before the high-profile arrests of the late ’80s and early ’90s.

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LeVar Burton wants the web to save reading and ‘Reading Rainbow’

Even after Reading Rainbow ended its 26-year-long run in 2009, series host LeVar Burton wasn’t ready to drop its mission of promoting reading habits and literacy. He brought the series back as an iPad app two years ago, to much acclaim, but Burton still hasn’t been satisfied with what it’s been able to accomplish. “97 percent of the families in [the United States] have access to the web,” Burton tells The Verge by phone. But tablets — where Reading Rainbow now lives — are far more limited: “Only about 33 percent have access to tablet computing.”

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The Cookbook by London’s BBQ Experts, Pitt Cue Co.: From smoking meats to salads and slaws, the British foursome’s new release is required reading for summer grilling

The Cookbook by London's BBQ Experts, Pitt Cue Co.


While grilling meat over an open flame might be humanity’s first foray into cooking, it’s a style in which we have stopped striving for perfection—that perfect balance of smoke and sweetness is all due to the flame, the cut of the meat and…

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Cool Hunting

Medium launches iPhone app for reading stories on the go

After a short delay, Medium released its iPhone app today with a focus on reading and recommending stories. “Every week, thousands of people come to Medium to write,” company founder Ev Williams said in a post on the site. “That’s the hard part. We’re just helping amplify their voices.”

After signing in with Twitter, the app presents you with a list of stories based on what’s popular and what you have already chosen to follow. It tells you about how long it will take to read each story, and if you get bored partway through, you can swipe to the next story. The app also lets you share articles through Twitter, Facebook and email.

A kind of YouTube for text

Medium, which has raised $ 25 million, has evolved into a kind of YouTube…

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Alliteration Inspiration: Reading & Royalty

Alliteration Inspiration is a weekly column featuring the top twenty pieces of visual inspiration based on two random alliterative themes. This week’s thematic combo: reading & royalty.

Reading

Stephen King rightfully states that “books are a uniquely portable magic.” And though it’s difficult for a blog post to capture anything close to the magic that reading a book can inspire, these ten visual page-turners are filled cover to cover with creativity.

Alliteration Inspiration: Reading & Royalty / on Design Work Life
Ben Vaquero / Illustrations
Alliteration Inspiration: Reading & Royalty / on Design Work Life
Maurizio Pagnozzi / Logo & collateral concept – Book publishing house
Alliteration Inspiration: Reading & Royalty / on Design Work Life
Samantha Schroeder / Painted window mural – Literati Bookstore
Alliteration Inspiration: Reading & Royalty / on Design Work Life
Jotaká / Illustration
Alliteration Inspiration: Reading & Royalty / on Design Work Life
Carolin Rauen / Bookmark design
Alliteration Inspiration: Reading & Royalty / on Design Work Life
Marco Villar / Hand lettering
Alliteration Inspiration: Reading & Royalty / on Design Work Life
Chris Pecora / Screenprinted postcard
Alliteration Inspiration: Reading & Royalty / on Design Work Life
Sara Infante / Hand-lettered & illustrated postcard series
Alliteration Inspiration: Reading & Royalty / on Design Work Life
Sean Heisler / Logo concept – Children’s Digital Library
Alliteration Inspiration: Reading & Royalty / on Design Work Life
Cuddlefish Press / Letterpress cards

Royalty

“Power makes you a monarch,” Laurell K. Hamilton says, “and all the fancy robes in the world won’t do the job without it.” We can’t all be born into the royal family, so instead up our creative brain power to take full command our own mental monarchy. No matter your bloodline, embrace these ten royal offerings and you’ll be solemnly sworn in as a duke or duchess of design smarts.

Paprika / Wine label - Cuvée Margot Rosée
Paprika / Wine label – Cuvée Margot Rosé
Bayley Design / Typeface - Albert
Bayley Design / Typeface – Albert
Lange & Lange / Restaurant design - Queen Burger
Lange & Lange / Restaurant design – Queen Burger
Jason Carne / Illustration & hand-drawn type
Jason Carne / Illustration & hand-drawn type
Won-kyoung Seo / Pattern & poster design
Won-kyoung Seo / Pattern & poster design
Doe Eyed / T-shirt design
Doe Eyed / T-shirt design
YouWorkForThem / Typography
YouWorkForThem / Typography
Pavla Chuykina / Branding & packaging concept - Be True
Pavla Chuykina / Brand identity & packaging concept – Be True
Nicholas D'Amico / Typography
Nicholas D’Amico / Typography
Monster Riot / Biscuit packaging
Monster Riot / Packaging


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How to create distraction-free reading on the web

Read more about How to create distraction-free reading on the web at CreativeBloq.com


It’s somewhat ironic that right now I am writing this article in a distraction free environment called Editorially, because right now you’re reading
    


Creative Bloq

Chrome extension uses colored text to speed up online reading

Lots of apps have offered the promise of reading text faster, but a Chrome extension called Beeline Reader is using an unexpected tool to get there: colored text. Built on top of the Readability code, the extension works by reformatting the text on a page into a single stripped-down column, then color-coding alternating lines of text to ensure readers never get lost. According to a recent study, that’s enough to get the average person through a block of text ten percent faster.

While the trick itself is simple, there’s a surprising amount of psychological background to it. The developer tells Fast Company that he was inspired by the Stroop Test in psychology, which shows that readers inevitably perceive the color of the text they’re…

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