All posts tagged “Redefining”

Redefining Wearable Tech at Decoded Fashion NYC: Exploring new relationships with technology as it becomes part of the daily lexicon for identity and self-expression

Redefining Wearable Tech at Decoded Fashion NYC

The NYC Decoded Fashion summit proved to be an especially good-looking tech conference. Not to say that the average tech conference is unattractive, but this crowd obviously cares as much about aesthetics and presentation as they do about software……

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Cool Hunting

Carl Smith on redefining identities and ideals

Read more about Carl Smith on redefining identities and ideals at CreativeBloq.com


Enter the code generate100 at the checkout by midnight EST today, 13 June, to get $ 100 off your ticket to Generate New York! Carl Smith will be delighting the audience at Generate New York on 20 June by speaking about recapturing your youthful swagger in order to be a better entrepreneur.




Creative Bloq

Carl Smith on redefining identities and ideals

Read more about Carl Smith on redefining identities and ideals at CreativeBloq.com


I think life is something you prototype, just like a developer would prototype an app, or a marketer would A/B test a design,” says Carl Smith. “I keep trying things I’m uncomfortable with, and sometimes it’s a bloody mess, and sometimes, it’s really, really awesome.”
    




Creative Bloq

Five Elephant: Kris Schackman and Sophie Weigensamer are redefining how Berliners take their coffee

Five Elephant


by Jason Kenny There’s a corner of Berlin where three canals meet, separating the über desirable Kreuzberg, the increasingly trendy Neukölln and the largely ignored Treptow. While one of the canals between Kreuzberg and Treptow once served as a part of…

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Cool Hunting

Redefining the art of self-portraits with a CT scanner and 3D printer

Photo

A Dutch sculptor has created a series of 3D-printed reproductions of his own body parts. Caspar Berger scanned his entire body in an advanced CT scanner to create a pixel-perfect 3D map of his skeleton before using a 3D printer to produce a series of sculpted self-portraits.

“A self-portrait that has not been made by the artist.”

With Self-portrait 21, Berger sent his 3D printed skull to a forensic anthropologist, who “received the skull anonymously accompanied only by the information that it belonged to a man in his mid-40s born in Western Europe. The anthropologist then used clay reconstruction methods to recreate the artist’s muscles, tissue, and skin structure, creating an accurate portrait without knowledge of what the subject…

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