All posts tagged “Round”

ListenUp: Kali Uchis: Ridin Round

Kali Uchis: Ridin Round


Don’t be fooled by the way Colombian native Kali Uchis sweetly sings her rhymes. “Baby understand—I don’t need a man. Fuck me over, I’ll fuck you worse and take off to Japan,” the LA-based songwriter coos in the track “Ridin Round.” While comparisons……

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Cool Hunting

Font of the day: Hanken Round

Read more about Font of the day: Hanken Round at CreativeBloq.com


Here at Creative Bloq, we’re big fans of typography and we’re constantly on the hunt for new and exciting typefaces – especially




Creative Bloq

Creating Round, Flat and Flip-Style CSS Toggle Switches


In this tutorial, we show how to easily create some fantastic round, flat and flip-style CSS toggle switches. We’ll be using pure CSS to create some toggle switches, adding a neat user experience to checkbox functionality.

The Reasoning

Often times, we find ourselves needing users to check/uncheck a checkbox to signify a yes/no answer to some question or statement. We set up a label, a checkbox input type, and fetch the boolean value after form submission to see if the user has left the box checked or unchecked. We’re all aware what default checkbox styling looks like, and there’s no pure CSS way to style a checkbox. It’s an element who’s style is managed separately by each browser engine. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a smoother interface, like we see in mobile apps sometimes?

But wait! A little CSS trickery can solve that for us, and by combining the :checked, :before, and :after pseudo classes to our checkbox input, we can achieve some beautiful toggle-type switches with smooth transitioning effects. No black magic…just pure CSS beauty. Let’s get started.

Laying The Foundations

The HTML is nothing we haven’t seen before. It’s a standard checkbox input with a corresponding label. Each of these label/input combinations are wrapped inside a div. I gave mine a class of switch. I’m going to demonstrate 3 different styles:

  1. Round style toggle (similar to iOS toggle switches)
  2. Round style with a flat finish
  3. Yes/no flip style switch

Each style will be targeted by a class that is attached to the input element. Labels will be targeted using the input + label selector targeting, and so they don’t need class names of their own. And now, let’s look at the HTML:

<div class="switch">
  <input id="cmn-toggle-1" class="cmn-toggle cmn-toggle-round" type="checkbox">
  <label for="cmn-toggle-1"></label>
</div>
 
<div class="switch">
  <input id="cmn-toggle-4" class="cmn-toggle cmn-toggle-round-flat" type="checkbox">
  <label for="cmn-toggle-4"></label>
</div>
 
<div class="switch">
  <input id="cmn-toggle-7" class="cmn-toggle cmn-toggle-yes-no" type="checkbox">
  <label for="cmn-toggle-7" data-on="Yes" data-off="No"></label>
</div>

Nothing major there. For the CSS, we want the actual checkbox to be hidden way off screen and out of sight. The label is where we’ll actually do all the styling. It’s convenient, because clicking on the label will actually “check” or “uncheck” the checkbox. Here’s the CSS that we’ll be implementing for all toggle switches:

.cmn-toggle {
  position: absolute;
  margin-left: -9999px;
  visibility: hidden;
}
.cmn-toggle + label {
  display: block;
  position: relative;
  cursor: pointer;
  outline: none;
  user-select: none;
}

All of our switches will require a little math to get right, but scaling up and scaling down is a breeze once you wrap your head around it. If you’re using Sass (or any other CSS preprocessor), it become even more a breeze because you can set some variables and just change them up. As usual, I’ll be using the box-sizing: border-box property on everything. The CSS presented below (and above) is un-prefixed, so make sure you prefix yours if you’re copying from the tutorial. If you download the source, everything is prefixed for you. Without further ado, let’s dig into the examples.

Example 1 – Round Style CSS Toggle Switch

Round Style CSS Toggle Switches

Our label, acting as our container, has a width and height. We set a background colour on it too, which will simulate a border on our toggle switch. Our :before element will simulate the inner light-grey area of the switch, and will transition into green. The :after element will be the actual round switch that sits on top of everything, and slides from left to right on click. It’ll have a box-shadow also to make it stand up above everything else. We’ll change the background colour of the :before element and the position of the :after element when the input takes on the pseudo class :checked, and everything will transition smoothly. Here’s the CSS:

input.cmn-toggle-round + label {
  padding: 2px;
  width: 120px;
  height: 60px;
  background-color: #dddddd;
  border-radius: 60px;
}
input.cmn-toggle-round + label:before,
input.cmn-toggle-round + label:after {
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  top: 1px;
  left: 1px;
  bottom: 1px;
  content: "";
}
input.cmn-toggle-round + label:before {
  right: 1px;
  background-color: #f1f1f1;
  border-radius: 60px;
  transition: background 0.4s;
}
input.cmn-toggle-round + label:after {
  width: 58px;
  background-color: #fff;
  border-radius: 100%;
  box-shadow: 0 2px 5px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.3);
  transition: margin 0.4s;
}
input.cmn-toggle-round:checked + label:before {
  background-color: #8ce196;
}
input.cmn-toggle-round:checked + label:after {
  margin-left: 60px;
}

Example 2 – Round Style Switch With Flat Finish

Round Style Switch With Flat Finish tutorial

This example is fairly similar to example 1, the main difference being the aesthetic presentation of it. It fits right in line with the slick flat trends of modern websites, but functions the same as example 1. The CSS will only represent a change in aesthetic, the rest is the same. Here’s the CSS:

input.cmn-toggle-round-flat + label {
  padding: 2px;
  width: 120px;
  height: 60px;
  background-color: #dddddd;
  border-radius: 60px;
  transition: background 0.4s;
}
input.cmn-toggle-round-flat + label:before,
input.cmn-toggle-round-flat + label:after {
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  content: "";
}
input.cmn-toggle-round-flat + label:before {
  top: 2px;
  left: 2px;
  bottom: 2px;
  right: 2px;
  background-color: #fff;
  border-radius: 60px;
  transition: background 0.4s;
}
input.cmn-toggle-round-flat + label:after {
  top: 4px;
  left: 4px;
  bottom: 4px;
  width: 52px;
  background-color: #dddddd;
  border-radius: 52px;
  transition: margin 0.4s, background 0.4s;
}
input.cmn-toggle-round-flat:checked + label {
  background-color: #8ce196;
}
input.cmn-toggle-round-flat:checked + label:after {
  margin-left: 60px;
  background-color: #8ce196;
}

Example 3 – Yes/No Flip Style CSS Toggle Switch

Yes/No Flip Style CSS Toggle Switch tutorial

Now we’re gonna do something a little different. We’re going to create flip style CSS toggle switches. The default view will be greyed out and say “No” (or anything that signifies unchecked), and the checked view will be green with “Yes” written in it. When the label is clicked, the switch will flip over, spinning 180 degrees (that’s 3.142 radians for you engineers!) on its y-axis, revealing the opposite side. We’re going to populate the content of the unchecked/checked switch by using data-attributes. These data-attributes were specified in the HTML by data-on and data-off, each of which will populate the :after and :before pseudo elements respectively. Take note of the backface-visibility on the :after element, which initially hides its back side due to its starting point at -180 degrees. Here’s the CSS:

input.cmn-toggle-yes-no + label {
  padding: 2px;
  width: 120px;
  height: 60px;
}
input.cmn-toggle-yes-no + label:before,
input.cmn-toggle-yes-no + label:after {
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  right: 0;
  color: #fff;
  font-family: "Roboto Slab", serif;
  font-size: 20px;
  text-align: center;
  line-height: 60px;
}
input.cmn-toggle-yes-no + label:before {
  background-color: #dddddd;
  content: attr(data-off);
  transition: transform 0.5s;
  backface-visibility: hidden;
}
input.cmn-toggle-yes-no + label:after {
  background-color: #8ce196;
  content: attr(data-on);
  transition: transform 0.5s;
  transform: rotateY(180deg);
  backface-visibility: hidden;
}
input.cmn-toggle-yes-no:checked + label:before {
  transform: rotateY(180deg);
}
input.cmn-toggle-yes-no:checked + label:after {
  transform: rotateY(0);
}

Browser Support

Browser support for all of this is very high. IE8 and down fails to recognize the :checked pseudo class, so you’ll want to do some feature detection to make sure that old IE’s fallback to normal checkboxes. CSS transitions aren’t supported from IE9 and down, so this would only interfere with the transition part of the toggle. It should work just fine otherwise, with the switches snapping from one position to the next (still a nice touch).

Wrap Up

And that’s a wrap folks, some nice CSS toggle switches! This technique keeps everything totally semantic, doesn’t add any crazy markup, and is done with pure CSS goodness. Of course, be mindful of browser support, but it’s no big deal to cater to older browsers with conditional styles. Using the examples presented above, there’s no shortage of approaches you can take on. I hope you enjoyed this tutorial and learned something. Feel free to download the source code and view the demo, and leave any comments, questions, or feedback below.


The post Creating Round, Flat and Flip-Style CSS Toggle Switches appeared first on Speckyboy Design Magazine.


Speckyboy Design Magazine

WYSIWYG Round Up

WYSIWYG editors, structured content, in-line editing… lately, these words are everywhere. The conversation surrounding what content management systems and their accompanying WYSIWYG editors do, could do, and should do is a complex one. Rather than offer a clear solution—and trust us, if one existed we would share it—we’re following the conversation so that other UX designers can see where it all began, and hopefully join in.

It’s a conversation that’s going on, predominantly led by Karen McGrane, and I think it would be interesting to lead readers down the path: who said what when, and where you can read what they said to follow the discussion.

Your WYSIWYG Editor Sucks, by Rachel Andrew

Like any conversation, it’s hard to pinpoint the exact moment it segued, but July 2011 is a good starting place. That’s the month Rachel Andrew, managing director of edgeofmyseat.com, the company that created the CMS Perch, put down her thoughts on WYSIWYG editors in no uncertain terms.

“WYSIWYG Editors suck because they promote thinking about style rather than content” Rachel wrote, a precursor to the many arguments for adaptive content.

Inline Editing and the Cost of Leaky Abstractions, by Jeff Eaton

18 months later, in December 2012, digital strategist Jeff Eaton added his thoughts to the mix. Where Rachel might have been thrilled a year earlier with an inline editor, Jeff pointed out its flaws — inline editors are only contextual for one page at a time. Jeff had no solution to offer, but his perspective helped open many eyes to the possibilities.

WYSIWTF, by Karen McGrane

In May 2013 hundreds of content and digital strategists became suddenly aware that WYSIWYG editors had flaws that might be solved by a mindset shift. No, it wasn’t the singularity that caused this sudden awareness, it was an article written by Karen McGrane, championing semantic markup and a view of content as “chunks” rather than “blobs.”

One sentence in particular is striking, for its focus is not on a new CMS or some other new product. “Defining what goes in a field and what goes in a tag requires a tighter collaboration between content authors, CMS architects, and front-end developers. It’s time we started having these conversations,” Karen told us.

WYSIWYG and In Place Editing for Structured Content, by Dries Buytaert

That same month, this past May, is when Dries Buytaert, the creator of Drupal, joined the conversation. In addition to highlighting Karen McGrane’s DrupalCon keynote, Dries added his own thoughts to the mix, particularly around Drupal’s authoring system.

“We’ve been talking about the advantages and disadvantages of WYSIWYG for more than 10 years now, and we still haven’t figured out better approaches. The best we’ve been able to do is to evolve WYSIWYG editing and in-place editing to apply to individual chunks instead of the entire page, to generate clean markup and to better guide authors to make them aware that their input may end up in many forms of output.” Even as Dries disagreed with elements of Karen’s keynote, he began to embrace the language of blobs and chunks.

Many more content creators, editors, and strategists began to join the conversation, many of them responding to Karen’s anti-WYSYWIG battle cry. Slowly but surely the lines were divided: between WYSIWYG and in-line editing supporters, and between structured and unstructured content supporters. The Truth about WYSIWYG Editing in Your CMS, by Tom Wentworth is a good example of one such article, responding to Karen while also offering additional perspective.

WYSIWTF by Rasmus Skjolden

Then, in August, Rasmus Skjolden, the creative lead of the team that built the CMS TYPO3, wrote his own ranting battle cry. Rasmus summarized much of the summer’s debate, and suggested we come together to create something better.

“I think much of the criticism in the content strategy community against inline editing has been based on the premise that inline editing is synonomous only with WYSIWYG editing,” Rasmus said. Most of the summer of 2013, the discussion was concerned with mindset shifts, but Rasmus brought back the possibility of a solution by way of a software change. Instead of changing the editors or choosing between in-line and WYSIWYG editors, Rasmus suggested a change in the way “preview” works, to better preview adaptive content. Once again, the conversation shifted.

Responsive Design won’t Solve your Content Problem, by Karen McGrane

Now, in December, the conversation continues, and we hope readers will share their own experiences or articles in the comments. But if there’s one more article to read to bring us up to speed, it’s another by Karen McGrane, from just last month, November 2013.

As the blobs-and-chunks discussion progressed over the summer, so did the responsive design and adaptive content discussion. The two are linked, to the point that some strategists began suggesting that responsive design would automatically result in structured content — a myth that Karen quickly laid to rest.

Where to next?

In our rapidly shifting world of technology, the conversation on WYSIWYG, inlined editing, and structured content is far from over. Come join the conversation!


The post WYSIWYG Round Up appeared first on UX Booth.


The UX Booth

The most innovative tech developments of 2013 – a round up

2013 may have been a turbulent year financially and politically, but for technological innovation it ranks as one of the best and most exciting 12 months for a long time. It seems that times of…

For full article and other interesting tech related stuff visit the website.
SkyTechGeek

Round: 2012 Jewish International Film Festival Identity and Collateral

In 2012, Australia-based Studio Round was tasked with developing a brand new identity for the Jewish International Film Festival. Their goal was to reposition the event as a “contemporary, forward-thinking selection of international Jewish films, and move it away from its stereotypes.”

Round: Jewish International Film Festival / on Design Work Life Round: Jewish International Film Festival / on Design Work Life

Our approach speaks to both the Jewish and the wider, local community of film lovers. The concept was centred around the idea of different worlds colliding, the contemporary and traditional, and the thought-provoking, diverse selection of films. What resulted was something not so kosher — an identity that reflected the new vision and passion for the future of the festival; a platform for discussion and dialogue, a celebration of diversity, and new ways of looking at Jewish film.

Round: Jewish International Film Festival / on Design Work Life Round: Jewish International Film Festival / on Design Work Life Round: Jewish International Film Festival / on Design Work Life Round: Jewish International Film Festival / on Design Work Life Round: Jewish International Film Festival / on Design Work Life Round: Jewish International Film Festival / on Design Work Life Round: Jewish International Film Festival / on Design Work Life


Design Work Life

Sex Toys with Style: A round up of our latest well-designed favorites for all genders

Sex Toys with Style


After research (and even testing) we’ve selected these beautiful, useful and entirely playful toys—designed with style—to add new dimension to your sex life. Some of these items are for women, some are for men and some are for both, or even sharing. We’re not concerned with who uses what, just…

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Cool Hunting

Seven Outstanding Espresso Blends: We’re celebrating National Espresso Day with a round up of our favorite beans, a mixture of classics and new

Seven Outstanding Espresso Blends


While the legitimacy of these abundant “national” holidays that tend to pop up arbitrarily is definitely in question, we couldn’t pass up tomorrow’s opportunity—National Espresso Day—to pay homage to one of the purest ways to prepare coffee: espresso. The thick, concentrated brew packed…

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Cool Hunting

Samsung announces the Galaxy Round, a smartphone with a curved OLED display

Samsung has taken the wrapper off its rumored smartphone with a curved OLED display. The Galaxy Round, which will launch on SK Telecom in South Korea, has a 5.7-inch 1080p screen the same size as seen on the company’s Galaxy Note 3, but there’s a difference — it curves on the vertical axis in a similar fashion to some of Samsung’s OLED TVs.

Check battery life by tilting your phone on a table

The potential benefit of this screen technology isn’t quite clear yet, but Samsung is touting a new feature called “Round Interaction,” which allows you to look at information such as missed calls, battery life, and the date and time when you tilt it on a flat surface with the screen off. Samsung also claims that switching between home screens…

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