All posts tagged “royalties”

Taylor Swift’s label hits back at Spotify by disclosing streaming royalties

The war of words continues between music streaming service Spotify and powerful pop icon Taylor Swift. After Swift removed her entire catalog from the streaming service last week, Spotify boss Daniel Ek said that she, along with other mainstream artists, was on track to earn over $ 6 million in royalties this year. But Scott Borchetta, CEO of Swift’s label Big Machine, has countered that claim, saying that the “Shake It Off” singer had earned less than $ 500,000 from Spotify streams in the US in the last 12 months.

A Spotify spokesperson told Time that Swift had been paid a total of $ 2 million over the last 12 months for the global streaming of her songs, but Borchetta still maintains that Spotify is a blight on the music industry. “The…

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How one company is helping small musicians find ‘buried treasure’ in YouTube royalties

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One of YouTube’s longest-standing problems is attribution — with the huge amount of user-generated videos being uploaded, it’s a major challenge to keep on top of what has been licensed properly and what hasn’t. This extends to audio, as well; plenty of videos are shared with unlicensed soundtracks. That’s a particular problem for smaller artists without the backing of a major record company or publisher, so a New York startup called Audiam is filling the gap. According to Bloomberg Businessweek, Audiam just completed a test case with composer Scott Schreer, a musician who has written some 1,700 instrumental tracks that he licenses to film and TV producers. Thanks to Audiam, Schreer’s catalog is now bringing in about $ 30,000 each month…

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At first Congressional hearing on internet radio royalties bill, traditional radio takes center stage

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Today the House Judiciary Committee held a hearing on music licensing as a first step toward voting on HR 6480, the Internet Radio Fairness Act of 2012, which would set new standards for determining internet radio royalty rates. It’s an issue that Congress has struggled with for more than a decade, and its involvement has resulted in various stop-gap legislation to appease the music indstry. Both sides, radio broadcasters and the recording industry, say they want a fairer way to determine what the price of music should be. Much of the disagreement surrounds the rates set by the Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) — a trio of judges that set rates and terms for statutory licenses, which allow broadcasters to use and pay for copyrighted works…

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